Dating of paper

09 Dec

Whilst our beautiful shop, set in an 1880's historical building in Parnell, Auckland is being renovated, we have opened further up the road in gorgeous temporary premises at 272 Parnell Road – opposite the fabulous NSP restaurant and next to Jonathan Grant Gallery.

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Desmond Clark (1979) wrote that were it not for radiocarbon dating, "we would still be foundering in a sea of imprecisions sometime bred of inspired guesswork but more often of imaginative speculation" (Clark, 1979:7).

Writing of the European Upper Palaeolithic, Movius (1960) concluded that "time alone is the lens that can throw it into focus".

Then these thin "boards" are pasted together much like laminated wood. The pith is cut into a thin layer of ivory-like texture by means of a sharp knife. It was, thin, feted, formed, flat made in porous molds from macerated vegetable fiber.

(Hunter 1943,4) Before the 3rd century AD, the first paper was made of disintegrating cloth- bark of trees and vegetation such as mulberry, hemp, china grass (Hunter 1943,56)Paper was used in China from AD 868, for engraving religious pictures and reached its height of in 1634 with the wooden block prints made popular by Sung Ying-hsing.

The technology of making paper moved from China to Japan and then to Korea in AD 610 where it was commonly made from mulberry bark and Gampi. (Hunter 1943,59) Marco Polo gave one of the first descriptions of Chinese papermaking in his 'Milione'.

(Hunter 1943, 117) The fibers are then intermixed with water and by the use of a sieve-like screen, the fibers are lifted from the water leaving a sheet of matted fiber on the screen. (Hunter 1943, 5) Many people include think of papyrus and rice paper as paper. Papyrus is not made from macerated fiber so, it is not true paper.

"Everything which has come down to us from heathendom is wrapped in a thick fog; it belongs to a space of time we cannot measure.

We know that it is older than Christendom, but whether by a couple of years or a couple of centuries, or even by more than a millenium, we can do no more than guess." [Rasmus Nyerup, (Danish antiquarian), 1802 (in Trigger, 19)].

The long fibers of the mulberry kozo paper give this paper a soft feel, yet they create a highly durable paper.

Tear the edges of Mulberry Kozo Paper and you get a soft, feathered edge creating a perfect accent for projects such as stationery, wedding invitations and scrapbooks.